Residents & Alumni Stories | Project HOME

Residents & Alumni Stories

 

Julia Binswanger is a student at Bowdoin College who is volunteering her writing skills for Project HOME this summer. 

Fifty-one-year-old Antoine Parks is a fighter.

From 1981 to 1993 this South Philadelphia native was stationed in Iraq. There he worked in artillery and served in direct combat. In short, he risked his life for our country so that those of us at home don’t have to. Thus, one would assume that in 1993, after over ten years of service when Antoine was finally discharged, he would be done fighting.

 

“Every day I wake up, the first thing that I do is thank the Lord for letting me see another day clean and sober.”

Crystal Lincoln has certainly come a long way from where she in her life before coming to Project HOME: struggling to avoid the streets and to overcome a mean addiction. She had transitioned between residing with her sister and family to living in recovery programs and homeless shelters. She was unable to provide for her two youngest daughters and could not keep them under her care.

 

Taisha Shaw is a case manager at Project HOME's Rowan Homes.

With over a decade of sobriety under her belt Ms. Taryn Perkins is a shining star in the Project HOME Rowan Homes’ community.  Having been born and raised in the biggest city in Delaware Ms. Taryn made a choice to seek assistance and support in Philadelphia and hasn’t looked back.  Committed to growth and change Ms. Taryn has taken the opportunities before her to excel and become an outstanding example for not only her daughters and son but her whole community.

 

Holly McBride did her measure best to keep her children out of the Philadelphia shelter system.

For years, she worked hard to find them spare spaces with family members and friends, but her options eventually ran out and Holly and her children were forced into a shelter system she had successfully avoided for so long.

Luckily, their stay would be a short one. In 2008, the 28-year-old mom was able to move her twin boys, Thomas and Gabriel, into Project HOME's Rowan Homes residence, and she hasn't looked back.

 

As her horse galloped toward the fence, Janet Scobell readied herself for a maneuver she had performed countless times before during her competitive career.

She realized - too late - that this jump was to be anything but routine. The horse balked, throwing Janet, and, in its subsequent panic, trampled her back.

The accident left her on permanent disability, bringing to a premature close her 32-year primary career as a successful commercial artist. Scobell's sudden, steep decline in income forced her to sell her Delaware County home.

 

Curtis Stubbs' situation had become dire in the weeks before Project HOME outreach worker Sam Santiago entered his life.

Suffering from untreated schizophrenia and drug addiction, Curtis’ sense of hopelessness had already driven him to attempt suicide once. He was living on a razor’s edge and he knew it; so when Sam offered him a way out, Curtis grabbed it with both hands.

"I'm still working on myself," he admits. "But if I didn't have Project HOME I'd be in one of two places: jail or six feet under. Project HOME is a blessing."

 

"Whoever saves a life, it is considered as if he saved the entire world."  (The Talmud)

Richard Brown was a jovial spirit with a ready smile, a hearty laugh, and a heart as big as his large frame. To be in his presence and soak in his friendly and gentle spirit, you couldn’t imagine that this same person had once been an angry and despairing addict living on the streets.

 

Betty Mills-Robinson’s story is not one of potential denied, but of potential delayed.

At 14, Mills-Robinson left her mother’s warm home, situated as it was in an otherwise difficult North Philadelphia neighborhood, and moved in with an aunt who could offer a safer environment in which to live and go to school. She took full advantage of the opportunity, zipping through high school and steadily moving up the ranks in her career with the City of Philadelphia. Not even an unexpected diagnosis of bipolar disorder, it seemed, could derail the 23-year-old’s upward trajectory.

 

While at 1515 Fairmount's Employment Services Department, the Mayor emphasized his commitment to finding new ways to combat an old problem (unemployment by those who were previously homeless or who are poor).

 

We are excited to announce our newest line of Holiday cards featuring artwork and creative expressions by some of our talented residents. One of the cards, shown here, features a painting by Felice Ross, a resident at our Connelly House residence. The inside of the card contains a poem written by April Parker, who also resides at Connelly House. (She was profiled earlier in this blog.)

"Home"

By April Venesha Parker

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