Images of Home in a House of Peace | Project HOME

Images of Home in a House of Peace

Project HOME, in partnership with the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation (PDCD), contracted with Meg Saligman Studio and Collette Fu to collaborate on creating art for our newest residence Francis House of Peace, or in its Chinese name, Ping An (“House of Peace”).

One part of the art is in the lobby of Francis House of Peace, where you discover a row of wooden doors reminiscent of a hundred-eye apothecary drawer or Chinese medicine/herbal chest. When one pulls on the Sun Pull handle, the door will drop down and a scene made from layers of images pop-up. The pulls represent the strength and brilliance of the sun, to complement the outside moon imagery. The outside of the drawers are labeled with the titles to mimic how herbs are labeled on the outside of apothecary drawers. The pop-ups are compiled from images Colette Fu has taken on her many trips to China. The 5 pop-up drawers represent different idyllic landscapes in China that represent Home.  

1. Rice Terraces.  Yuanyang Rice Terrace Fields -one of the most famous rice terracing in China located in Yunnan Province.  They represent a harmony of nature and human will.

2. Stone Forest. Stone Forest - forest of limestone formations in Yunnan Province.

3. Zhangjiajie. Wulingyuan Mountains - known for its quartzite sandstone pillars in Hunan Province, it was the inspiration for the film Avatar. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

4. Bamboo Forest. Anji Bamboo Forest, site of filming Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in Zhejiang Province.

5. Shanghai. The Bund– this is a view from the historic Bund waterfront area. This modern landscape (of Pudong) is the most known icon of Shanghai.

6. Tastes of China. Philadelphia Chinatown - Foods from different regions of China that can be found in our own Chinatown are featured here.

Artists Meg Saligman (left) and Collette Fu (right) with John Chin, director of   Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation.

Artists Meg Saligman (left) and Collette Fu (right) with John Chin, director of 

Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation.