Who helps those who don’t go viral like Johnny Bobbitt? | Opinion | Project HOME

Who helps those who don’t go viral like Johnny Bobbitt? | Opinion

 

With $400,000 the city could buy 5,333 doses of naloxone — a medication that reverses an opioid overdose — potentially saving as many lives. The money could also pay for a methadone treatment — the gold standard of addiction treatment — for 85 people for a year. Sister Mary Scullion, executive director of Project HOME, a nonprofit that works at the intersection of homelessness and addiction, is in the midst of developing 100 recovery housing units in Kensington for homeless people in addiction. The housing is coupled with employment, health care, and recovery services. With $400,000 she could fund 21 to 24 units — depending on extent of services — for a year.