[NEWS] SEPTA’s new regional rail turnstile design keeps Key card users in and the city’s homeless population out | Project HOME

[NEWS] SEPTA’s new regional rail turnstile design keeps Key card users in and the city’s homeless population out

 

From Philadelphia Weekly

The Hub of Hope is a partnership between SEPTA, the City of Philadelphia and homeless activist organization Project HOME. Spokespeople from both SEPTA and the City of Philadelphia cited the good works of the Hub of Hope when asked only about the turnstiles’ impact on the homeless populations.

In email correspondence, PW posed the following question to Alicia Taylor, director of communications for the City of Philadelphia’s Health and Human Services Department:

“With the turnstiles now being enforced at the train stations, does this hurt homeless access to shared space? One homeless man also said some of the bathrooms are cut off from the turnstiles, do you know if this is true?”

Taylor’s response read:

“In 2017, in anticipation of the installation of the new Key system, SEPTA invested nearly $1M in the Hub of Hope, a new daytime engagement center for people experiencing homelessness, who would otherwise likely have been in the Concourse. In our view, this was both pragmatic and compassionate – not to mention forward thinking – on the part of SEPTA. They are the first transit authority in the country to try to address homelessness by providing a place for people to go to get food, services and medical care.”