Hub of Hope | Project HOME

Hub of Hope

 

From 6ABC

The bitterly cold weather is especially dangerous for the homeless and a local organization is working extra hard to ensure they have a warm place to stay.

At just after 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, the temperature read 18 degrees.

The wind was howling outside of White Rock Baptist Church at 53rd and Chestnut streets where a homeless woman sat.

Hub of Hope

From CBS 3

The underground hub for Center City’s homeless is in limbo, just as Philadelphia gets hit with its first code blue temperatures of the year.

 

From NBC 10

On any given night, about a third of Center City's homeless -- about 100 people -- sleep in the concourse under Philadelphia's Suburban Station. Project HOME's "cafe" -- a type of drop-in services center -- has operated there over the last three winters.

Another Successful Season at the Hub of Hope

As we move into summer, we wanted to share with you some exciting outcomes from the Hub of Hope — one of our winter initiatives this frigid winter.  The detailed report can be accessed here.

 

The Hub of Hope was a walk-in engagement center located under Two Penn Center in Philadelphia, providing social and health services to individuals experiencing long-term homelessness living in and around the subway concourses from January through early April 2014.

 

The Hub of Hope is a walk-in engagement center located under Two Penn Center in Philadelphia, providing social and health services to individuals experiencing long-term homelessness living in and around the subway concourses.

 

Yesterday, we printed an article from our News from HOME newsletter about the Hub of Hope. Today, we print a personal reflection from Kat Delancey about her experience as a volunteer at the Hub.

 

The spring edition of our News from HOME newsletter is hitting mailboxes this week.  We are reprinting here one of our front-page stories, about our second annual Hub of Hope winter initiative.  To read the entire newsletter online, click here. 

 

Karen Orrick is the Project Coordinator for the Hub of Hope and Strategic Initiatives.

K. Earl left Philadelphia in 2000, running from a past that would eventually catch up with him.

After two stints in prison, K. Earl found himself back in Philadelphia, where he bounced in and out of halfway houses, shelters, bus stations, and the street, all the while hiding his duress from his family. 

 

Curtis Stubbs' situation had become dire in the weeks before Project HOME outreach worker Sam Santiago entered his life.

Suffering from untreated schizophrenia and drug addiction, Curtis’ sense of hopelessness had already driven him to attempt suicide once. He was living on a razor’s edge and he knew it; so when Sam offered him a way out, Curtis grabbed it with both hands.

"I'm still working on myself," he admits. "But if I didn't have Project HOME I'd be in one of two places: jail or six feet under. Project HOME is a blessing."

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